• Charles Amwayi owns his own shop selling fishing supplies. The Entrepreneurship Training gave him a lot of useful ideas.
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  • Groups of up to 20 young entrepreneurs meet up every week to exchange experiences and learn more about running a business.
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  • The equipment Charles sells helps local fishermen do their job. He is proud to be able to make a contribution to the local community.
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  • Calistas is now a self-employed photographer – and business is booming.
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  • Michael Ogutu makes and sells his own soap. He is currently working on a uniform branding for his products.
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  • Jeremiah Otieno has achieved a ten-fold increase in income by realigning his business. He now sells fish offal to factories in Uganda.
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Running a small successful business of their own is something many people would like to do. For people living in slum districts or remote rural areas of Kenya, however, it is often the only opportunity they have to generate their own income. There are few employers and many people live from hand to mouth, taking any occasional job that presents itself. But these people often have promising ideas that could be implemented successfully, provided they receive systematic backing and the right tools for the trade.

Promoting personal initiative and an entrepreneurial mindset, Siemens Stiftung provides practical training courses and regular mentoring for micro-entrepreneurs and ambitious young people. For this purpose, a mini-study program for budding social entrepreneurs has been developed in collaboration with the Kenyatta University. In addition to instilling basic business know-how and elementary technical proficiency, this program focuses on the development of personal skills and competencies. The goal is to open up economic, entrepreneurial and social perspectives for young Kenyans who are perhaps already self-employed or wish to start their own small businesses. The program is being carried out at locations that other Siemens Stiftung projects have helped to establish, such as the Safe Water Enterprises or the Water-Energy Hubs (WE!Hubs). In addition to the local entrepreneurs, the social entrepreneurship training also benefits the people working in these existing programs.